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Maryland Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard – A Lot of Change for No Action

During this year’s legislative session, the Maryland General Assembly passed the Maryland Clean Energy Jobs Act.  Maryland’s governor, Larry Hogan, then had until 30 days after the legislative session (i.e., until May 30) to sign the bill, veto the bill, or take no action.  By taking no action, the bill would automatically become law.  The governor took no action and the bill is now law. 

RPS

The new law increases Maryland’s renewable energy portfolio standard (RPS) from 25% by 2020 to 50% by 2030.  This is shown graphically below, along with Maryland’s original 2004 and 2017 RPS goals (also see Maryland RPS – Veto Override):

Solar Carve Out

The law also increases the “solar carve out” from 2.5% by 2020 to 14.5% by 2028.  This is a dramatic increase and is shown graphically below: 

The following table shows the Maryland solar carve out as a percentage of the total Maryland RPS, increasing from 10% in 2019 to about 30% in 2027 and beyond.

SRECs

Prior to the bill being passed by the Maryland legislature, Maryland renewable energy credits (SRECs) were trading at about $16 per megawatt-hour.  Upon passage of the bill, Maryland SRECs increased to about $47 per megawatt-hour.  With the bill now becoming law, Maryland SRECs have increased in value to $63 per megawatt-hour. 

Economic Value

A 45 megawatt solar project with a 15% capacity factor would generate 59,130 megawatt-hours per year:

45 megawatts x 15% CF x 8,760 hours per year = 59,130 megawatt-hours

Prior to the bill being passed by the Maryland legislature, 59,130 megawatt-hours of Maryland SRECs were worth $946,080 annually.  With the passage of the bill, this value increased to $2,779,110.  With the bill now law, the value has increased to $3,725,190.  Please note that this ignores transaction costs.

Thought of in units generally used in utility billing, these SREC values equate to an increase from 1.6 cents per kilowatt-hour to 6.3 cents per kilowatt-hour. 

This represents value to the owner of the SRECs in addition to the value received for the energy production from the solar facility. 

If the energy output of the solar project in this example is sold for 6 cents per kilowatt-hour, SRECs now add another 6.3 cents, for a total of 12.3 cents per kilowatt-hour.   

That’s a lot of change for no action. 

Note:  This Maryland legislation includes a grandfathering provision, meaning that customers who sign up for or extend their supply contracts before the grandfathering period ends are grandfathered from the additional RPS costs until the expiration of the grandfathered contracts.  This is a good time to consider extending your electricity supply contracts.  Contact us for more details.

Evelyn Teel contributed to this article.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.avalonenergy.us, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at info@avalonenergy.us.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2019 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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Avalon Energy Services Turns 10 Years Old This Month

Late 2008/early 2009 was an unsettling time.  Bear Stearns was bailed out, Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, the housing market collapsed, credit markets were frozen, the stock market fell more than 40%, the unemployment rate was approaching 10%, and energy markets were in turmoil.  The Great Recession was underway.  Despite this uncertainty, during April of 2009, Avalon Energy Services, LLC was established. 

More than a few of our family and friends suggested we were crazy to start a business during such a difficult economic time.  We probably were.  But, with expanded customer choice and intense energy commodity price volatility, confusion was immense and we saw a clear need among energy users for independent and objective energy-related advice.  Our belief was that with a singular focus on the individual needs of energy users, we could help.  So, we set off on a mission to help commercial and industrial customers “save energy and save money.” 

Today, energy users have more options than ever for energy procurement and usage, including onsite and offsite renewable energy, energy storage, and combined heat and power (CHP), to name just a few.  Sustainability has also become a major consideration, and customers have access to numerous options for ensuring their energy usage aligns with their needs and priorities. 

Referrals from satisfied customers have enabled Avalon to grow and serve an expanded market, but we continue to maintain a singular focus on each customer’s individual needs and priorities.  The turmoil of the Great Recession may have abated, but the need for professional guidance in navigating energy usage, procurement, and sustainability has only grown.  At ten years old, we are proud to continue to provide our customers with top quality independent and objective advice based on sound economics.

Evelyn Teel wrote this article.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.avalonenergy.us, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at info@avalonenergy.us.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2019 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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New England Electricity Rates: Quite a Difference

By Jim McDonnell and Evelyn Teel, Avalon Energy Services, LLC

Compared to the rest of the United States, electricity prices in New England are high.  Nothing surprising there.  So, just how expensive are they?  Well, it depends.  And, the surprising part is which utility, in one comparison, has the lowest rates.

First, some background.

Eversource Energy is an investor-owned utility headquartered in Hartford, CT and Boston, MA.  Eversource is the rebranded name of Northeast Utilities, after its merger with NSTAR in 2012.  Through its three electric distribution companies, Eversource operates New England’s largest energy delivery system and has 3.2 million electricity customers.          

United Illuminating Company, a subsidiary of Avangrid, Inc., is an electric distribution company serving 325,000 customers in Connecticut.  Avangrid, through its four electric utility subsidiaries, serves about 2.2 million customers in New England and New York State.     

Wallingford, Connecticut is a town of 45,000 people located between Hartford and New Haven.  Despite its size, the town operates its own municipal electric utility, known as the Wallingford Electric Division (WED). 

Despite operating in the same geographic area, the three utilities vary dramatically in terms of their rates and the costs to their consumers.

A recent bill insert sent out by WED provided the following rate comparison.  These are residential rates for an account that averages 750 kWh per month.  

Utilities have different energy procurement strategies and different infrastructure issues, which contribute to their varied pricing. Furthermore, municipal electric utilities are exempt from certain mandates that affect the pricing of larger utilities.  However, the 6.2 and 11.5 cents per kWh differences between a small municipal utility and the two large investor-owned utilities are dramatic. 

Note:  The WED bill insert was provided by Dan McDonnell of Wallingford, CT.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.avalonenergy.us, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at info@avalonenergy.us.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2019 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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Electricity, meet Rock

For several years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been investigating the potential effects of intense geomagnetic storms on electric utility infrastructure.  In 2016 they concluded,

“A severe geomagnetic storm could disrupt the nation’s power grid for months, potentially leading to widespread blackouts.  Resulting damage and disruption from such an event could cost more than $1 trillion, with a full recovery time taking months to years.” (1)

Bloomberg recently noted that in an upcoming report, the USGS more specifically identifies a stretch of the Interstate 95 corridor as particularly at risk of power outages related to geomagnetic storms.

This corridor is largely underlain by Paleozoic (very old) crystalline rock that acts as an insulator, reflecting back incoming energy from the sun, thus giving that energy a second chance to damage utility infrastructure.  Damaged electrical infrastructure, particularly utility transformers, can take many months to replace.

“Through a stroke of bad luck, the worst of these rocks basically traces the path of I-95 from Richmond, Virginia, to Portland, Maine, passing through Washington, New York and Boston along the way.” (2)

Putting aside for the moment the notion that rocks can be inherently good or bad, concerning how this connection between electricity and rocks may impact the electric grid, solutions are not simple.  Some may look to off-grid self-generation and battery storage for protection.  But, if a geomagnetic storm is strong enough to impact the grid, it also may impact the electric infrastructure at individual customers’ sites.

Faraday cages are a potential solution.  Faraday cages also may provide protection against EMPs (electromagnetic pulses).  More on this in the weeks ahead.

References:

Evelyn Teel, Ralph Russell and Jeff Dowdell contributed to this article.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.AvalonEnergy.US, email us at info@avalonenergy.us, or call us at 888-484-8096.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2018 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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NCAC – 22nd Annual Washington Energy Policy Conference

ONE WEEK FROM TODAY

Secure your spot here: https://www.ncac-usaee.org/event-2845352

Energy Technologies and Innovations: A Disturbance in the [Market] Force

Thursday, April 12, 2018, 8:30 AM to 6:00 PM

The George Washington University

Keynote speakers:

Mark P. Mills, Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute

Gil Quiniones, President and CEO, New York Power Authority

In addition to these keynote speakers, the following panels will be held:

PANEL 1: The Grid Awakens: Electricity Generation and Demand
Phil Jones, Executive Director, Alliance for Transportation Electrification
Bryce Smith, Founder and CEO, LevelTen Energy
John Zahurancik, COO, Fluence
Barney Rush, Board Member ISO New England, Rush Energy Consulting (moderator)

PANEL 2: Hydrocarbons Strike Back: Innovations to Maintain the Status Quo

John Eichberger, Executive Director, Fuels Institute
Sid Green, President, Enhanced Production Inc.
Mike Trammel, Vice President for Government, Environmental, and Regulatory Affairs, Excelerate
Rita Beale, CEO and President, Energy Unlimited (moderator)

PANEL 3: Innovation: A New Hope in Energy

Bill Farris, Associate Laboratory Director for Innovation, Partnering, and Outreach, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Elisabeth Olson, Economist, Office of Energy Policy & Innovation, FERC
Christopher Peoples, Managing Partner, Peoples Partners and Associates
Devin Hartman, Electricity Policy Manager, R Street Institute (moderator)

PANEL 4: Return of Energy Policy

Adele Morris, Policy Director for Climate and Energy Economics, Brookings
Jason Stanek, Senior Counsel, House Energy & Commerce Committee, Subcommittee on Energy
Pat Wood, Chairman, Dynegy
Kevin Book, Managing Partner, ClearView Energy Partners (moderator)

Note: Chatham House Rules apply.

Full Agenda and to register –> http://www.ncac-usaee.org/events.php#event151

RSVP: Required

Conference Information:

Organizer: Michael Ratner, NCAC-USAEE Vice President (mratner@crs.loc.gov) / 202-707-9529
Venue: The George Washington University, The Marvin Center, 3rd floor, Continental Ballroom, 800 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052

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Balancing Congestion

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved a change in PJM’s (the Mid-Atlantic grid operator) tariff, allowing them to shift what are called “balancing congestion” costs to load serving entities.  FERC approved PJM’s tariff revision with an effective date of June 1.  Suppliers have indicated that they intend to pass through these charges.  Suppliers include a change of law or regulation provision in their agreements.  Basically, they commit to a fixed price, but allow for pass-throughs when there is a change in law or regulation.  Please email or call to discuss the potential impact of these charges to you.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.AvalonEnergy.US, email us at info@avalonenergy.us, or call us at 888-484-8096.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2017 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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Maryland Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) – Veto Override

Last week, the Maryland House and Senate voted to override Governor Larry Hogan’s 2016 veto of the 2016 Clean Energy Jobs bill.  As a result, Maryland’s Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) will increase from 20% in 2022 to 25% in 2020.  The graph below shows the effect of the original RPS rule in blue overlaid with the newly amended rule in red.

Maryland’s solar “carve out” will increase as well as shown below.

Regulatory guidance is that customers with executed retail electric contracts in place prior to the effective date of the override are grandfathered from the additional RPS costs until the expiration of the grandfathered contract.

This is a good time to consider extending your electricity supply contracts to year 2021.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.AvalonEnergy.US, email us at info@avalonenergy.us, or call us at 888-484-8096.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2017 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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In The News – Avalon Energy Services, LLC

In his year-end review titled, “Gas Industry Looks Optimistically at 2017,” PointLogic author Kevin Adler quotes our COO, Jim McDonnell.  Scroll down to the bottom of the report which you can find here.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.AvalonEnergy.US, email us at info@avalonenergy.us, or call us at 888-484-8096.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

Copyright 2017 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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Separate Paths – Part 2

By Ana Rasmussen, Intern

Our last blog post Separate Paths – Part 1 looked at how electricity distribution costs have been rising since 2008 and many of our readers have had questions about just why this is happening.  In order to explore this, and to try to get some answers, I dove in and analyzed seven years’ worth of Pepco electric bills from a representative home in Pepco’s Maryland service territory.  Before sharing my findings, I want to acknowledge that my base data is just from one household, which can be problematic for making generalizations.  However, the kWh rates for individual charges should be representative and similar for other residences in the area over these years.  I cannot account for differences in usage from one household to the next, but I believe this can shed some light on the larger shifts taking place within the utility cost structure.

First, once all of the data was collected and organized I looked at the percentages of the total bills that were from electricity distribution, transmission and generation.  As you can see in the charts below, a drastic transformation has taken place.  In 2009 distribution charges accounted for 24.6% of the total bill, but by 2015 it makes up 41.7% of it. The portion of the bill coming from transmission charges also more than doubles during this period resulting in generation’s share to fall to just over 50% of the total bill.  While generation’s portion of the bill has been falling, transmission and distribution have been on the rise since 2009.

Next, I decided to focus on distribution and breakdown the individual rates and charges included under distribution on the Pepco bills.  The four most important components of the distribution charge, and the way in which they are charged, are as follows:

Please note Pepco’s distribution energy charges are different from their generation energy charges.  Generation energy charges represent the cost of procuring energy for customers.  Distribution energy charges represent the cost of providing electricity delivery services to customers.  These distribution energy charges are billed on a kilowatt-hour usage basis.  So, while they are referred to as “energy charges,” they do not relate to the procurement of energy, only to the delivery of energy.

The customer charge is a flat rate charged once a month. Over this period, the charge has gradually risen from $6.65 to $7.39 a month. In the chart below you can see the yearly average rate for the other three primary components of distribution.  Although the Montgomery Country Energy Tax has fallen slightly since 2009, both distribution energy charge and Empower MD charge have risen.

Throughout this time period the average yearly distribution energy charge has been increasing, but to get a better understanding of it on a unit rates basis, I charted them by month. Below you can see how the rate falls in the winter months and rises during the summer months. Over the seven year period, the distribution energy charge has increased, on average, about 6.8% per year.  Also notable is the growing distance from peak to trough each year.

After an in depth look at seven years’ worth of residential Pepco electric utility bills, the shifts in generation, transmission and especially distribution have become more clear. Although far from perfect due to a lack of access a broader set of data, I hope that this analysis has been able to provide some insight on current trends and answer some of your questions.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.AvalonEnergy.US, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at jmcdonnell@avalonenergy.us.  Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.  Copyright 2016 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC.

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Separate Paths – Part 1

By Ana Rasmussen, Intern

Since the shale boom began in earnest during 2008, natural gas prices in the US wholesale market have fallen dramatically. Prices have hovered within the 2 to 6 dollar per million Btu (mmBtu) range over the last few years, with the prompt month NYMEX natural gas contract trading at a remarkably low $1.70 mmbtu today. As we have been reporting for some time, wholesale electricity prices have also experienced a similarly dramatic decline, although that relationship has been weakening in recent months (see Natural Gas and Electricity Are Parting Ways – Part 1 and Natural Gas and Electricity Are Parting Ways – Part 2).  Given the decline in wholesale electricity prices, many of our readers have asked us why they have not seen a similar decline in their home electricity bills.

To answer this question we examined electric utility bills from a typical Maryland residence from the last 10 years and broken down the different charges included in the total cost. First, if you single out generation and transmission (G&T) charges during this time period, you can see in the graph below that they have been more or less in decline since the end of 2008. G&T charges represent the costs of producing electricity and of moving high voltage electricity from generation facilities to distribution lines.

However, this does not give us the whole picture. Our electricity bills are not only based on G&T, but distribution costs as well. As you can see below, while generation and transmission have been declining, distribution charges have actually been rising. Distribution charges include the costs of maintaining, expanding and improving the electric system to deliver electricity from high voltage transmission system to customers, homes and businesses, as well as the utility’s depreciation expense and return on rate base.  Other components of distribution costs include, but are not limited to, grid resiliency, environmental surcharges and county energy taxes.

Ultimately, simultaneously falling G&T charges and rising distribution charges are to blame for the lack of change in our electric utility bills at home, even with wholesale prices so low. In the final graph you can see the total utility bill charges have remained relatively stable as a result of this gradual cost shift from G&T to distribution over the last few years.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.AvalonEnergy.US, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at jmcdonnell@avalonenergy.us.  Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.  Copyright 2016 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC.Blog 058 - image 04