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In the News: Jim McDonnell Talks Energy Markets and Covid-19

By Evelyn Teel

Our Chief Operating Officer, Jim McDonnell, was the lead-off speaker for the first session of the Maryland Clean Energy Center’s Energy Economy Speaker Series. The topic was State of the Sector: Impacts of Covid-19 on the Energy Economy. Jim provided a broad energy market update and then focused on the differential impact of the pandemic on energy usage in various industry sectors. The recording can be found at the following link:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUDbbjNvnQc&feature=youtu.be

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.avalonenergy.us, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at info@avalonenergy.us.

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Copyright 2020 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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Welcome Back to 1976

By Evelyn Teel and Jim McDonnell

Our last blog post discussed the trend of decreasing natural gas prices in the 2010s (please find that blog post at this link: https://avalonenergy.us/2020/01/down-down-down-energy-prices-in-the-2010s/). What does the trend in natural gas prices look like if we go further back in time?  To answer this question, we extended our look-back to 44 years. 

The graph below shows natural gas prices (monthly average) over the 528 months spanning January 1976 through December 2019. Prices have fluctuated significantly, with particularly big run-ups during the early 2000s. Natural gas prices have been as low as $0.54/mmBtu and as high as $10.79.  Overall, prices have trended upwards. These prices are in “nominal” dollars, meaning dollars of the day, and are not adjusted for inflation.

If we sort the 528 months of price data from lowest to highest, we can see that today’s prices are significantly below both the median and average prices of the full dataset. This means that for the majority of the past 4+ decades, natural gas prices have been higher than they are today.

As indicated, the two graphs above show prices in nominal dollars. When we adjust for inflation, the story changes rather dramatically. The following two graphs show the pricing data in “real” dollars, specifically adjusted into today’s dollars.

Adjusted for inflation, over the 528 months, the low price was $1.87/mmBtu and the high was $13.33/mmBtu. Overall, inflation adjusted prices have trended sideways.  

Looking at the December 2019 monthly average of $2.22/mmBtu, it is very nearly the lowest natural gas price since 1976, adjusted for inflation. More specifically, it was the 8th lowest of all 528 months under review.

The graph below shows nominal and real natural gas prices plotted together. Viewing the data this way highlights the effects of inflation.

It is remarkable to note that, in real dollars, natural gas prices are basically the same as they were 44 years ago – and they are significantly lower today than they have been for most of that period. Plus, not only are prices low today, they are expected to remain low for the foreseeable future. Appending the natural gas forward curve (which represents the market’s view of pricing five years, and even further, into the future) to the historical real dollar price graph shows that prices are expected to remain flat. 

So, when a friend refers to 1976 as a wonderful time of low natural gas prices, trading at around $0.54/mmBtu, tell them, adjusted for inflation, that is $2.50/mmBtu in today’s dollars.  With current prices as of this writing now below $2.00/mmBtu, for natural gas buyers, as Carly Simon sings, “…these are the good old days.” For natural gas producers, not so much.        

The natural gas market has seen some remarkable changes since 1976, driven by technological advances, economic fluctuations, and global political considerations. It is also increasingly sharing the electricity-generation space with a range of competitors, particularly a rapidly-expanding volume of renewables such as wind and solar. It is an exciting time, as the US is generating increasingly clean electricity and building a more sustainable energy system. We can be relatively certain that the energy market in 2064 won’t much resemble the one today, and it will be fascinating to see which factors most drive change in the future.

Interested in learning how you can benefit from today’s low energy prices? Call or email us today and we’d be happy to help you explore your options.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.avalonenergy.us, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at info@avalonenergy.us

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

All images copyright 2020 Avalon Energy® Services LLC

Copyright 2020 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC

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Down, Down, Down: Energy Prices in the 2010s

By Evelyn Teel

A previous blog post highlighted the shale gas revolution as arguably the most significant energy-related development of the previous decade (you can find the post here: https://avalonenergy.us/2019/12/shale-we-review-the-2010s/). In this article, we will discuss another trend that was significant in the 2010s – declining energy prices.

Natural Gas Prices 

One major effect of the shale gas revolution has been that energy prices in the United States have dropped. In particular, natural gas prices have dropped precipitously as new supply has come online. Prices are significantly lower than they were in 2010 generally, and nearing a third of what they were in January 2010 specifically. Please see the graph below, which shows monthly average natural gas prices at the Henry Hub. 

Superimposing a best-fit linear trend line (in red on the graph below) shows just how dramatic the decade-long decline in prices has been. A few peaks and valleys along the way can obscure the overall change, but the trend line shows that prices are approaching half of what they were in 2010. 

The Forward Curve

The above graphs illustrate that natural gas prices are significantly lower today than they were a decade ago. Equally notable is the change in the forward curve over the past decade. The forward curve represents the market’s expectation of natural gas prices from one month to five years, and even longer, into the future. Below is the 60-month forward curve as of July 9, 2010. The trend was upward sloping, meaning that the market expected prices to continue to rise, with prices ranging from $4.58/mmBtu up to $6.61 per mmBtu.

In the graph below, the natural gas forward curve as of January 21, 2020 has been added. The trend line of this 60-month forward curve is very nearly flat. This means the market expects prices to stay fairly level with prices fluctuating very modestly, between $1.89 per mmBtu and $2.81 per mmBtu.

Electricity Prices

Though less significantly than natural gas prices, electricity prices have likewise fallen. The graph below shows average annual day-ahead electricity prices in PJM. Though there were a few price jumps along the way, the trend over the past decade was that prices declined. Compared to prices in 2010, prices in 2019 were down approximately $20 per MWh.

Historically, natural gas has often been the marginal generation source called upon to produce electricity, meaning that natural gas generation often sets the price for electricity.  While the relationship between natural gas and electricity prices changes over time, the correlation has generally been strong. Also note, that though electricity prices in the wholesale market have fallen, utility distribution charges have been on the rise, and this has generally offset reductions in the cost of electricity generation on customers’ bills. For more information on the evolving relationship between natural gas and electricity prices, please see several of our previous blog posts:

Natural Gas and Electricity Are Parting Ways – Part 1

Natural Gas and Electricity Are Parting Ways – Part 2

Separate Paths – Part 1

Separate Paths – Part 2

Conclusion

With shale gas production projected to increase for the foreseeable future; the US expected to continue expanding as an exporter of liquified natural gas (LNG); greater emphasis on economic discipline (profitability over singular focus on reserve additions) by E&P companies; and the electricity fuel mix continuing to change based on both economics and technical advances that allow increasing renewables into the mix, it will be interesting to see how energy prices respond in the coming decade.

Interested in locking in today’s low energy prices? Please call or email us to discuss your options.

The Avalon Advantage – Visit our website at www.avalonenergy.us, call us at 888-484-8096, or email us at info@avalonenergy.us.

Please feel free to share this article.  If you do, please email or post the web link.  Unauthorized copying, retransmission, or republication is prohibited.

All images copyright 2020 Avalon Energy® Services LLC

Copyright 2020 by Avalon Energy® Services LLC